almond kringle

This is a very old pastry recipe that I first made over 45 years ago.  It is one of my absolute favorite pastries.  It has always been a labor of love to make, since you need to proof the dough overnight in the refrigerator, making it a two-day process.

This pastry is made with an almond paste made by a company called “Solo”, and I found this recipe on the wrapper of the can those many years ago.

solo-almond-cake-and-pastry-filling-041642001017

Unfortunately, there came a point where I could not find the “Solo” brand in the grocery store anymore and I assumed the company went out of business.  So, for the last 30 years, I have not made this pastry.

To my surprise, this past Christmas, I found a can of the almond paste sitting at the end of an aisle in the grocery store.  I quickly grabbed a can, not knowing for sure what I was going to do with it, since sadly, I had also lost the recipe.  When I arrived home, I promptly tore the wrapper off of the can, hoping to find the recipe printed there, but it was not.

Well, while deep cleaning my kitchen after it’s repainting over the holidays, to my absolute delight, I found the missing recipe for Almond Kringle.  And over the weekend, I made the recipe with great hope that it would taste as wonderful as I remembered it.

Here is one half of the dough rolled out, with the almond paste spread down the middle.

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From this point, the sides are folded over the paste, and the pastry flipped and laid on a baking sheet where it can rise until double in size.  After baking, it is iced while still warm . . . and it didn’t disappoint.  As wonderful as remembered.

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I took it to work to share so I wouldn’t eat it all myself and it was well received.  Hopefully . . . maybe . . . there will be a piece left when I get to the office tomorrow.

I don’t know how long this baking frenzy of mine will last, but I am truly enjoying it . . . and so are my coworkers.

Almond Kringle

1-12 oz. can Solo Almond Filling

2 cups sifted flour

1/2 tsp. salt

1 Tablespoon sugar

1/2 cup butter

1 package active dry yeast

1/4 cup warm water

1/4 cup cold milk

1 egg, beaten

Sift together flour, salt, and sugar.  Cut in the butter.  Soften yeast in warm water for 5 minutes.  Combine milk and egg.  Stir yeast and egg mixture into the flour mixture, mixing enough to dampen the flour.  Cover and refrigerate overnight.  Divide dough into two parts.  Keep half of the dough in the refrigerator while rolling out the first half.  Roll half of the dough into an 18″ x 10″ rectangle.  Spread half of the almond filling lengthwise in a strip down the center of the dough.  Bring the sides over, one overlapping the other.  Pinch ends, and turn the dough over onto a baking sheet, lapped side down.  Repeat with remaining dough.  Cover, and let rise until double in size.  Bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes or until golden brown.  While warm, frost with Browned Butter Icing.

Browned Butter Icing:  Lightly brown 1/4 cup butter over medium heat;  remove from heat.  Gradually beat in 1-1/2 cups of sifted confectioners’ sugar, 3/4 tsp. vanilla, and enough water to make of spreading consistency

8 thoughts on “almond kringle

    1. I’m not real knowledgeable on my types of pastries. This one did not rise as much as I thought it should have, but it was flaky and tasty. It seemed sweet to me, but maybe the almond paste flavored it a bit while baking.

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  1. If I remember correctly, it never was a yeast pastry that rose a lot. It is a lower lying pastry, almost more like a flaky strudel, but I was expecting a little more. Either way, the pastry was good.

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